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How Wall Street Fabricated A Buy And Hold Fairytale

 

Middle class retirement now largely a postcard fantasy – How Wall Street fabricated a buy and hold fairytale and jumped ship with taxpayer golden parachutes.  Did baby boomers think about who they would be selling those 401k and pension stocks to?

The days of dreaming about long days playing golf on a green course and taking luxurious cruises around the world are appearing more and more like a foggy memory for those in the middle class planning for retirement.  As Wall Street bankers and hedge fund managers rob the public blind, the mission statement sold to baby boomers is starting to become a large bait and switch catchy enough to make it on a Hallmark card.  For decades Wall Street begged and lured the public in either directly or through pension funds into their web of easy money.  Save $100 a month and you’ll retire a millionaire!  As it turns out, the golden parachute was only available to a tiny fraction of the population while the oligarchy in the financial sector offloads their toxic bets onto the taxpayers struggling balance sheet.  The end game?  No retirement.  At least no retirement like those plastered on glossy mutual fund brochures.  What the Wall Street banking charlatans failed to tell you is that you eventually need to sell those stocks to use the money for real world spending.  What they also failed to mention is that the baby boomer generation is now going to sell into unrelenting headwinds of demographics bringing on a younger and poorer generation to purchase their stocks.  Of course Social Security is in the crosshairs of the financial elite since they already secured their financial piece of the pie.  You know things are bad when the Federal Reserve is stating that stocks are not exactly a winners bet in the years going forward.

 

Retirement becoming more of a postcard fantasy

The middle class has been pillaged and ransacked by financial thievery for decades.  The debt bubble and mass delusion is now imploding.  The graft and con games taking place in the financial sector would be comical if they weren’t so real and economically tragic.  The Federal Reserve has given covert loans to big banks while big banks publicly stating all was well.  The Federal Reserve has grown their balance sheet to a stunning $2.8+ trillion of questionable assets and other junk with little redeemable market value.  It would have a hard time selling these items on eBay let alone the natural marketplace.  There is no easier way to make a profit than stealing from the taxpayer.  Of course the problems in the system are coming at the expense of the working and middle class.  For those who bought into the Wall Street mantra of buy and hold, making a profit has gotten much harder:

annualized rate of returns

This is fascinating data to look at.  This decade has been horrible for stocks.  The S&P 500 stands today where it did in 1998.  The massive stock volatility is simply a reflection of the problems deep in our financial system.  The above chart examines P/E ratios over time.  Really fascinating information but the Fed study finds that P/E ratios are likely to go lower because of demographic shifts and also the reality that we have a lower wage employment force dominating our economy.  The latest decade is a reflection of the bubble era machinery that has hoisted up the financial sector into an untouchable corner yet middle class Americans have taken it squarely in their stock portfolios.  Why?  Because Wall Street has been preaching buy and hold as if it were some patriotic mission but many of these hedge funds and banking managers have placed bets that openly aim against American middle class success.  In fact, some have made bets on flat out American failure and have made billions of dollars with lower tax rates that are given to hedge funds.

The stock market casino

The stock market has been on a wild ride for well over a decade:

PE Expansion Contraction

Source:  Mish Global Economic Analysis Blog

Read the rest at My Budget 360

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